Home School Years

Proverbs 22:6 – Train up a child in the way he should go, even when he is old, he will not depart from it.

Play On Words

Related Posts:

Using sight words for creative writing

Using sight words for creative writing

Rebus Stories

Vowel Faces Crafts

Concrete (Shape) Poems

Language Based Activities

Seashells By The Seashore (and other tongue twisters)

Recommended Books:

  • Alphabet Art: With A-Z Animals and Fingerplays by Judy Press
  • Animal Antics A to Z series books by Barbara deRubertis
  • Lemonade: And Other Poems Squeezed From A Single Word by Bob Raczka
  • Wumbers: It’s Words Cre8ted With Numbers! by Amy Krouse Rosenthal
  • Big Words For Little People by Jamie Lee Curtis
  • WordPlay Cafe: Cool Codes, Priceless Punzles & Phantastic Phonetic Phun by Michael Kline
  • Daily Word Ladders: Grades 1-2 by Scholastic
  • What Do Animals Do On The Weekend? Adventures from A to Z by Lauren Faulkenberry

Theme Ideas:

Alliterations ~ this lesson works equally well for a phonics, poetry or grammar based theme. Discuss alphabet, phonics, sentence structure and rhyme & repetition patterns. Explain that alliteration is a figure of speech where a vowel or consonant sound is repeated for poetic effect. Read any of the Animal Antics A to Z series book by Barbara deRupertis to review examples of alliterations. Then make a list of general sentences (include both alliterations and non-alliterations) and have the child pick out which ones are alliterations.

  • alliteration sentence: Alice’s aunt ate apples and acorns around August. (vowel a)
  • non-alliteration (standard) sentence: I left my backpack in school yesterday.

Anagrams/Word Puzzles ~ Read Lemonade: And Other Poems Squeezed From A Single Word by Bob Raczka to introduce the concept of anagrams or word puzzles. Then come up with anagram words using these topics or these word scramble worksheets by theme.

Wumbers ~ Read Wumbers: It’s Words Cre8ted With Numbers! by Amy Krouse Rosenthal which is a great way to introduce kids to the concept of using numbers in place of letters to create words. It’s a fun read and a great foundation for the concept of ‘texting’ or writing texts when they get older. These are some examples in the book: 4ks (forks), a10tion (attention), l8ter (later), ba6 (basics) and 1derful (wonderful). Using flash cards of numbers and letters, have the child come up with a list of wumbers.

Word Ladders ~ Explain that a word ladder is a vocabulary game in which you begin with a specific word at the bottom then you create a new word by following clues with each step until you reach the top. They are a great way to develop phonics and spelling skills. Word Ladder worksheets by theme.

Acrostic Poems ~ Explain how an acrostic poem uses each letter of a word to begin a line when writing a poem. You can use any of these ‘four seasons’ themed printables to build one:

Compound Words ~ Explain that a compound word is when two individual words come together to make a new word. Have the child put together compound words using flash cards, picture cutouts or a word list (worksheet). Another version is to give the compound word and have the child write the two base words (worksheet).

Synonyms & Antonyms ~ Using a list of words or set of flashcards, have the child say or write synonyms and antonyms of a word.

Conjunctions ~ Use this worksheet to discuss how conjunctions join sentences.

Contractions ~ Use these discuss how you can combine two words with an apostrophe.

Homographs vs. Homophones:

  • Homographs are words that share the same spelling but have different meanings. For instance: the word draw can mean: 1) to make a picture, 2) what we say when a game ends in a tie, or 3) to attract something or someone. (worksheet)
  • Homophones are words that share the same sound but have different meanings. For instance: the words write and right. (worksheet)

Tongue Twisters:

Spanish:

word(s) = palabra(s)

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